This "retro" technique still makes the best coffee

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/5y8Hp-nPdA8/this-retro-technique-still.html

http://boingboing.net/?p=510811

Although there will never be a consensus about the best way to make coffee, any coffee connoisseur will agree that controlling the grind of your beans and balancing water temperature are the keys to a tasty cup. Since your plastic coffee pot doesn’t really allow for that kind of customization, going back to the French press is the first step in upping your coffee game.

For a straightforward brewing process that yields full-bodied flavor, this Nuvita French Press is a great choice. Aside from its classy looks, this press is all business with a stainless steel frame and a heat-resistant, dishwasher-safe glass beaker. Unlike other models, this one features a double-screened filter to minimize sediment at the end of your cup.

Because all it needs is hot water and grounds, it's great for home and travel alike. And unlike pour-over devices that only brew a single serving, It makes 34 ounces, or 8 cups at a time.

Get this Nuvita French Press for just $14.99, 62% off retail.

Three kinds of propaganda, and what to do about them

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/IDDhSSgTSOQ/counternarratives-not-fact-che.html

http://boingboing.net/?p=511808

Jonathan Stray summarizes three different strains of propaganda, analyzing why they work, and suggesting counter-tactics: in Russia, it's about flooding the channel with a mix of lies and truth, crowding out other stories; in China, it's about suffocating arguments with happy-talk distractions, and for trolls like Milo Yiannopoulos, it's weaponizing hate, outraging people so they spread your message to the small, diffused minority of broken people who welcome your message and would otherwise be uneconomical to reach. (more…)

To understand trumpism, study the self-professed "betas" of 4chan

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/Fn4mQiCQ7mY/loserdom-embraced.html

http://boingboing.net/?p=511801

Dale Beran's been writing about 4chan, /b/ and Anonymous for years, and lurking on their message-boards, and he traces the rise of the self-professed "betas" who embody fragile, toxic masculinity and have been important bellwethers for many internet and real-world phenomena, linking them to Trump as "the loser who won": "Someone who is all brash confidence and then outrageously incompetent at everything he does." (more…)

Conservation biologist warns that "cyber-poachers" could use tracking tags to hunt endangered animal

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/ZoffFwZDINQ/threat-models.html

http://boingboing.net/?p=511796

In Troubling issues at the frontier of animal tracking for conservation and management, Carleton University biologist Steven Cooke and colleagues describe a series of incidents in which poachers have used tracking tags placed on wild animals for conservation purposes to find and kill those animals. (more…)

New York Times, CNN and other media barred from White House press event

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/pVTbq0Xl3_U/new-york-times-cnn-and-other.html

http://boingboing.net/?p=511762

The New York Times reports that it and at least two other media outlets, CNN and Politico, were barred today from a White House press event. Also locked out were the LA Times and Buzzfeed, writes Politico's Dan Diamond.

Journalists from The New York Times and two other news organizations were prohibited from attending a briefing by President Trump’s press secretary on Friday, a highly unusual breach of relations between the White House and its press corps.

Reporters from The Times, CNN and Politico were not allowed to enter the West Wing office of the press secretary, Sean M. Spicer, for the scheduled briefing. Aides to Mr. Spicer allowed in reporters from only a handpicked group of news organizations that, the White House said, had been previously confirmed to attend.

It's OK, though: Breitbart got in!

A master of miniature model-making shares his hard-earned secrets

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/NhlyTIvHyfk/a-master-of-miniature-model-ma.html

http://boingboing.net/?p=511752

I first discovered David Neat’s work via his website where he delves deeply into all sorts of fascinating interests, from furniture design to natural history to art. Mainly what drew me there was his extensive tutorials on all aspects of miniature model-making. The amount of content he’s posted is staggering, as is the quality of everything. Read comments about David’s site (or this book) and you will hear from seasoned pros, surprised by how much they’ve learned from David’s work.

Model-Making: Materials and Methods collects some of David’s best content from the site. While only 176 pages, this book manages to cram in a lot of eye-opening tips and techniques for building miniatures. David comes from the theater set-building world and teaches design and model-making, mainly with theater, TV, and movie models in mind, but the techniques in this book can be applied to all forms of model-making, from dioramas and dollhouses to tabletop miniature games and train layouts. Chapters cover model construction, molding and casting, working with metals, creating surfaces and textures (one of David’s strong suits), and finishing techniques.

I love a book that has so much to offer, you can simply poke your head into it for a few minutes and you’ve added a few more wrinkles to your brain by the time you put it down. Model-Making: Materials and Methods is such a book.

Model-Making: Materials and Methods
by David Neat
Crowood Press
2008, 176 pages, 8.5 x 0.5 x 11.0 inches, Hardcover
$33 Buy on Amazon

See sample pages from this book at Wink.

Teens were bored so they built a backyard roller coaster

http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/boingboing/iBag/~3/zzN-CnJgnyQ/teens-were-bored-so-they-built.html

http://boingboing.net/?p=511740

When two Wisconsin high school boys – sophomore JT Nejedlo and freshman Aidan Deaven – found themselves bored one summer, they decided to build a backyard roller coaster.

"We decided to build a roller coaster because it would be fun," said JT Needle.

As you can imagine, it was easier said than done. But with a dad who used to be a physics professor, they were given the green light to try, and try, and try.</a>

In fact, they tried for a few years – and finally succeeded. Although classmates teased them about it and teachers were skeptical, the boys – Nejedlo now a freshman at the University of Wisconsin and Deaven set to go there in the fall – recently finished their project with an awesome-looking coaster. They were honored by the school board on Tuesday. Sometimes boredom ain't such a bad thing.

Read the full story here.